Menu

Evening of film music

Evening of film music

For visitors to the Evening of Film Music in the Ziggo Dome and for TV viewers at home, experiencing film music has never been so lifelike. And all with the help of Augmented Reality; it was the first time tat this technology was used on such a large scale for so many audiences in the Netherlands.

  • A

Jurassic Park

Imagine. You are in the Ziggo Dome, among 10,999 other lovers of film music. At the first sounds of the Jurassic Park soundtrack, the roof opens virtually and you see life-sized dinosaurs bend over you. A little later, when the Metropole Orchestra starts using the Star Wars soundtrack by John Williams, space ships suddenly skim over your head and the laser beams fly around you.

Star Wars

Both for visitors to the Evening of Film Music and for TV viewers at home, experiencing film music has never been so lifelike. And all with the help of Augmented Reality; it was the first time that this technology was used on such a large scale for so many audiences in the Netherlands.
Behind the scenes

Behind the Scenes

The special feature of the project was that reality and Augmented Reality were seamlessly connected: "Stormtroopers ran through the audience and shot at the Millennium Falcon as it came flying into the room," said Luis Oliveira, Senior Technical Artist Augmented Reality at United. "As an audience or as a viewer at home you don't even know what is real and what isn't."

The project was not without challenge: "The most important thing was that the experience was optimal, both for the audience in the room and for the TV viewer at home," said Jeroen van Rossum, Business Development Manager at United. “The virtual elements had to be realized in a relatively short time, but they must be credible and recognizable. It was a live show, so there was no room to make adjustments afterwards. ”

A big challenge

Virtual scenes were just as big a challenge. The flight paths of the spaceships and the Pterodactyl birds, the laser beams of the Stormtroopers and the spaceships; everything was set up dynamically. "That means that you have to coordinate everything in real time," says Van Rossum. “You have to take into account the position of the elements and their interaction. Everything that happens must respond dynamically to each other. "
'Great achievement'

"I was frankly not so enthusiastic about the idea at first," admits director David Grifhorst. “When the team showed what is technically possible, I really got excited. What was finally put down was exactly what I had hoped for.